OPTIMIZATION OF WASTE PROCESSING AT A-THERMAL

A-Thermal have completed a project that optimizes the waste storage and treatment processes.  Our personnel are trained to measure, monitor and record the characteristics of hazardous waste that is delivered to A-Thermal.  Some of these characteristics include details of the pH, nature or phase, flash point, calorific value and reactivity of the hazardous waste.  

The abovementioned information is firstly used to determine on-site storage and segregation requirements.  Thereafter when the hazardous waste material is scheduled for treatment in the Thermal Desorption Plant.  

The scheduling process has since been improved as this process dictates if further waste preparation or neutralization prior to thermal treatment is required.  The hazardous waste is then transferred to the Thermal Desorption Plant by a conveyor belt (solid or sludge waste), in a batch furnace (for contaminated steel) or a flammable waste pumping station (liquid waste).  The scheduling process also considers concentrations of contaminants and volumes of waste streams processed, as this dictates relative feed rates, operating temperatures and residence times required to ensure the complete destruction of the hazardous waste.  

This also facilitates another exciting project that is nearing completion at A-Thermal, as we are producing a consistent carbonized residue by-product.  The physical and chemical properties are similar to coal, meaning it can be used as alternative fuel. The challenge to A-Thermal is being able to produce a consistent by-product with a variability of hazardous waste that is being processed.  Our waste streams are sourced from the pharmaceutical, petrochemical, tyre, chemical, pesticide and paint manufacturing industries.  We believe we may be the first thermal treatment facility that not only treats hazardous waste and renders the waste harmless to the environment, but we may also be able to produce an alternative fuel too!

Figure 2: Picture of Carbonized Residue Briquettes

Figure 2: Picture of Carbonized Residue Briquettes